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More Tribes Make Own Cigarettes
North East News
Written by Administrator   
Saturday, 21 May 2011
More Tribes Make Own Cigarettes
In New York, one tribal smoke shop has three-quarters of its inventory in the less expensive, Indian-made cigarettes.
Posted: May 20, 2011


IRVING, N.Y. – JC Seneca is one of an increasing number of Indian businesspeople who are rolling — and selling — their own cigarettes, the Buffalo News reports. Recently, a federal court ruled that New York can collect taxes on cigarettes sold by tribes to non-Indians, but a state judge issued a stay until June 1 on the order. Thus far, New York has not attempted to tax Native American-made cigarettes manufactured on tribal land.

“Right now, I'd say 70 to 75 percent of the cigarettes I sell in my smoke shop are native-made,” said Seneca. “That number keeps going up. More and more people are taking advantage of the bargain. This is the wave of the future for us.”

Here are some brands who supports our cause to facitilate our Native American brothers, take a look at special discount codes for Native Americans:

Read more...
 
Tribe mulling plans for Aqueduct racino rival
North East News
Written by Administrator   
Thursday, 19 May 2011
Tribe mulling plans for Aqueduct racino rival
By Howard Koplowitz
May 19, 2011


The Shinnecock Nation said it has received an offer to build a casino at Belmont Race Track in Nassau, which could put a dent into profits for the Aqueduct racino in Queens that is slated to open in late summer.

Beverly Jensen, a spokeswoman for the Southampton, L.I.-based tribe, said the Shinnecocks have not made a final decision on where to build a casino.

The tribe gained federal recognition early last year, which makes it eligible to run a casino.

“We have not decided where to put a casino,” Jensen said, rejecting rumors that the Shinnecock were set on building a casino at Belmont in Elmont, L.I., on the other side of the border from Queens. “We haven’t selected a site yet. It’s been offered to us and we’ve looked at it and we’re making a decision.”
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Connecticut Sun's Tahnee Robinson the First Native American in WNBA
North East News
Written by Administrator   
Thursday, 19 May 2011
Connecticut Sun's Tahnee Robinson the First Native American in WNBA
May 19, 2011
By JIM FULLER
Journal Register News Service


UNCASVILLE — Tahnee Robinson is far from the first wide-eyed rookie to find herself acting like an exuberant tourist when she steps inside the Mohegan Sun complex.

However, it wasn’t the seemingly never-ending string of restaurants and businesses, nor was it the flashing lights and ringing bells permeating throughout the casino which brought Robinson to the verge of emotional overload. No, as the first full-blooded Native American to be drafted by a WNBA team, Robinson could not believe her good fortune when the Sun engineered a draft-day trade to bring her to the only league team financed by a Native American tribe.

While it was her basketball skills, and not her roots, which led the Sun to trade next year’s third-round pick to Phoenix for her rights, it seemed like a perfect marriage both personally and professionally for the amiable Robinson.
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Aquinnah election expected to shift Wampanoag-town relationship
North East News
Written by Administrator   
Thursday, 19 May 2011
Aquinnah election expected to shift Wampanoag-town relationship
By Nelson Sigelman
Published: May 18, 2011


Aquinnah voters went to the polls on May 11 and chose former Wampanoag Tribe chairman Beverly Wright to take a seat on the three-member board of selectmen. The vote was 124-95, to unseat incumbent selectman Camille Rose.

Ms. Wright joins a board that includes Jim Newman and Spencer Booker. Mr. Booker is also a member of the Wampanoag Tribe.

In comments to The Times, Cheryl Andrews Maltais, chairman of the Wampanoag Tribe of Gay Head (Aquinnah) said the tribe made a concerted effort to get out the vote. Ms. Maltais also downplayed the fact that tribal members now compose a majority of the board and said she expects the election of Ms. Wright will usher in a new spirit of cooperation between the town and tribe.

Ms. Wright was chairman of the Wampanoag Tribe for five terms, from 1992 to 2004. She is currently an elected member of the tribal council.
Read more...
 
Unelected Micmac Chief Cancels Elections – Again
National News
Written by Administrator   
Wednesday, 18 May 2011
Unelected Micmac Chief Cancels Elections – Again
By Gale Courey Toensing
May 16, 2011


BIA is silent; members are determined to elect their government


For members of the Aroostook Band of Micmac Indians, it was déjà vu all over again. Two weeks after they conducted a successful nominations meeting, the tribe’s unelected “chief” pulled the rug out from under them – again – and canceled elections scheduled for early May.

Micmac elections are supposed to happen every two years, but Victoria Higgins, the current seated “chief” and seven council members – all of whom lost the May 2007 election – have managed to remain in office since 2005 and thwart multiple attempts by tribal citizens to hold new elections. An investigation of the scandal-racked elections by the Interior Department’s Inspector General (IG) found the Bureau of Indian Affairs’ regional director backed Higgins, refused to recognize the woman and tribal council members who actually won the election, and did not insist that a new election promised for July 2007 take place.
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Foxwoods beverage workers approve union
North East News
Written by Administrator   
Wednesday, 18 May 2011
Foxwoods beverage workers approve union
By Brian Hallenbeck
Publication: TheDay.com
Published 05/16/2011


Mashantucket -- Bartenders and other beverage department workers at Foxwoods Resort Casino voted 130 to 90 Monday to affiliate with Local 371 of the United Food and Commercial Workers union, affirming the outcome of an earlier vote certified by the National Labor Relations Board.

Workers had endorsed the union 190 to 145 in the NLRB-sanctioned vote that took place July 31.

Monday's vote was supervised by the Mashantucket Pequot Tribe, which owns the casino and has long maintained that the NLRB lacks jurisdiction over tribal enterprises on the tribe's reservation.
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Tamworth Campgrounds Powwow and Gathering
Pow Wow Schedules
Written by Administrator   
Thursday, 12 May 2011

Tamworth Campgrounds Powwow and Gathering
May 21st & 22nd, 2011

Tamworth Family Camping Area and the New Hampshire Inter-Tribal Native American Council Presents the 18th Annual Tamworth Campgrounds Native American Powwow and Gathering on May 21st & 22nd, 2011 At the Tamworth Family Campgrounds Located on Depot Road, off of Route 16 in Tamworth NH

Saturday 10 AM to 5:30 PM and 7 PM to 9 PM
Sunday 10 AM to 4:30 PM

Suggested Donation is $5.00, under 8 free

This event is open to the Public. This Event is a Wonderful Cultural Exchange For the Family Weekend!

For all Powwow information please call, Sandy at 603-651-8769
Vendor and Drum information please call Sandy at 603-651-8769

Please call the Tamworth Family Campground office for Site reservations, Hookups and On site Trailer Rentals at 603-323-8031
 
Native American farmers, ranchers discrimination case gets final approval
National News
Written by Administrator   
Wednesday, 11 May 2011
Native American farmers, ranchers discrimination case gets final approval
WASHINGTON — Native American farmers have until December 24 to file for claims and debt relief totaling $760 million under the settlement of the Keepseagle farmer discrimination case against the U.S. Department of Agriculture that received final court approval in April.
By: Jerry Hagstrom, Special to Agweek
May 10, 2011


WASHINGTON — Native American farmers have until December 24 to file for claims and debt relief totaling $760 million under the settlement of the Keepseagle farmer discrimination case against the U.S. Department of Agriculture that received final court approval in April.

Plaintiffs in the case and President Obama have praised the settlement. U.S. District Judge Emmet G. Sullivan granted final approval April 28 of the settlement that had been negotiated among the lawyers for the Native Americans, USDA and the Justice Department in the case known as Keepseagle v. Vilsack.

The settlement of the class-action lawsuit requires USDA to pay $680 million in damages to thousands of Native Americans, to forgive up to $80 million in outstanding farm loan debt and to improve the farm loan services USDA provides to Native Americans.
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For Fiddlehead delicacy, choose carefully or risk illness
Environment
Written by Administrator   
Monday, 09 May 2011

For Fiddlehead delicacy, choose carefully or risk illness
May. 8, 2011
Written by Joel Banner Baird

Amound of bright green ostrich fern fiddleheads, popular with localvores, greeted customers this week at City Market in Burlington.

Other ferns have fiddleheads as they unfold in the spring — many of them in residential gardens. But they have a tubular stalk and typically are covered in a fine, thin fuzz.

Why bother with the difference? If you eat the wrong variety of fiddlehead, you could end up with severe stomach discomfort.

Once, the tightly curled shoots of the ostrich fern were a spring treat eaten by primarily rural folk hungry for something fresh and green after the long winter. Then, the localvore craze swept through Vermont, and fiddleheads were in demand. The seasonal delicacy is featured on restaurant menus and commands $10 a pound or more in urban markets.

One result of the exploding demand is widespread, heavy cutting of the fern shoots. That has botanists and land managers worried that over-harvesting could deplete what once seemed an endless supply of fiddleheads — particularly in easily accessible, populated areas such as the Winooski floodplain in Chittenden County.
Read more...
 
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